Categories : Insect Of The Month
BEWARE OF THE MEALYBUG

by Carl White Master Gardener To those who are unaware, this is one garden pest whose life objective is to destroy your garden or flowers. Though so small, about 1/10th of an inch, 5 of these small insects will become 500 in only a few days. The active insect is the female that develops a hard shell about her and in this adult stage is harder to kill. They feed, quickly drain life from the plant, lay their eggs then die. Males develop with wings and when found Continue Reading...

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CICADA

by Carl White, Master Gardener We are all familiar with the sounds of summer including bird calls, trilling of crickets, drone of bees and most incessant is the buzzing of the cicada. Of the Order Hemiptera, these are true bugs and are closely related to leafhoppers, froghoppers and spittle bugs. The life cycle of the cicada begins with the laying of eggs by the female in plant stems where the emerging nymph lives on the plant xylem (fluid). Soon they drop to t Continue Reading...

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ASSASSIN BUG

 by Carl White     Learning to recognize the insects of the garden is so helpful in order that we don’t destroy the beneficial predators which aid us. Now who, among us, would love to see this monster on our flowers? But actually, they do us no harm if left alone and effectively help us. This effective predator hunter uses the large rostrum, snout, to puncture and secrete tissue dissolving saliva in its prey, thusly killing in this manner. Too numerous to picture here Continue Reading...

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LOVE THOSE INSECTS- PRAYING MANTIS

By Shan Wheeler, Master Gardener Trainee Insects are my “thing”… I love bees and butterflies (but who doesn’t?) and plant my garden to attract them. Most people try to prevent and spray insecticides to ward off insects, but there’s no need to be paranoid because some are good guys! You’ve heard about beneficial insects like Lady Bugs, but the stealthy, alien-out-of-this-world-looking Praying Mantis is one of my favorites. I once noticed what I thought was a new type Continue Reading...

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HONEY BEES

Master Gardeners Carl White, Bee Enthusiast, and Ron Nelson BeeKeeper   The soft buzz around the flowers, the constant flow of bees from the hive and one knows honey is in the making. However, the future of bees is in question at present, as the decline of hives and bees is a real problem. The problem seems to be CCD, or colony collapse disorder, in which colonies of bees are dying, sometimes finding only a queen and egg cells but no workers. The worldwide use of pestic Continue Reading...

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ARMY WORM

By Karen Miller, Master Gardener Entomology Specialist   Our “Ask a Master Gardener” program has received several inquiries about a pale green to brown or black worm, striped with white to yellowish lines from head to toe and munching on our warm season turf grasses.  These “worms” are actually the larvae stage or caterpillar of nocturnal moths known as Armyworm moths. It seems this insects common name, “the armyworm” describes the caterpillar’s eating habits, they eat until nothing i Continue Reading...

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SQUASH BUGS

Karen Miller, Entomologist Specialist Master Gardener   As Master Gardeners we are here to answer questions regarding gardening. This summer we have been bombarded with questions regarding squash bugs. I hope this article will answer some of those questions. The squash bug (Anasa tristis) is in the Order Heteroptera and Family Coreidae, known as true bugs, the squash bug can cause havoc on all vegetable crops in the cucu Continue Reading...

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GRASSHOPPER

By Karen Miller, Master Gardener Entomology Specialist   Are you one of the people who enjoying sitting on your porch at night listening to the crickets chirp? Is the sound relaxing or does it get on you last nerve? Whether you like or hate the sound, it is made by the male cricket looking to attract a mate, or warning another male not to invade his territory. The chirping sound is made by rubbing his wings together.. Crickets are found all over the world. There are about 900 species Continue Reading...

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PILL BUGS

By Karen Miller, Master Gardener Entomology Specialist   Most of us consider the Pill bug, aka Rollie Pollie or woodlice, a pest especially in large numbers. Though they are associated with insects and are called “bugs”, they are really crustaceans and more closely related to the shrimp and crayfish than to insects. They breathe through gills like their marine cousins and are the only known crustacean that lives its entire life on land. They are found in many dark, moist environments Continue Reading...

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MUD DAUBER

Karen Miller, Entomology Specialist Mud dauber is a common name given to a number of wasps that build their nest from mud. Also called “dirt dauber”, “dirt dobber” or “mud wasp”, these wasps are from the order Hymenoptera and the family Sphecidae. Adult mud daubers are ¾ to 1 inch in length and, depending on the species, vary in color from dull black to black with bright yellow markings to iridescent blue black. The feature that best identifies the mud dauber is its long, narrow waist – th Continue Reading...

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